MOUNDS AND MIGRANTS: A CLASH OF RELIGIONS IN THE LATE HOHOKAM WORLD
WITH DR. JEFFREY CLARK, DR. WILLIAM DOELLE AND LYLE BALENQUAH (HOPI)
FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 1, 2018

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The last 15 years have seen a dramatic increase in archae­ological understanding of precontact migration and the Salado “phenomenon” in the American Southwest. Join Drs. William Doelle and Jeffery Clark of Archaeology Southwest and other esteemed researchers at the fore­front of these recent investigations for a tour of southern and central Arizona, where you will explore the effects of this “clash” of Hohokam and Ancestral Pueblo ideologies.

Within the adobe and cobble mound ruins of south­ern Arizona lies evidence for the struggle between two native religions with very different origins and organiza­tions. One religion, with platform mounds as an integral part, developed in the densely populated Phoenix Basin, the center of the Hohokam archaeological culture. Another religion, at least partially expressed through symbols on Salado polychrome bowls and jars, devel­oped within Ancestral Pueblo immigrant communities, and was rapidly adopted by many locals.This tour will visit sites where both religions devel­oped, including large platform mound villages in the Phoenix area and Ancestral Pueblo enclaves in south­eastern Arizona. We will explore contested areas where the two religions overlapped, especially the well-pre­served and scenic San Pedro valley.

Hopi anthropologist and educator Lyle J. Balenquah will give tour participants an additional perspective of the voice of the Kayenta immigrants throughout the tour. You will also visit special museum collections that have been pivotal to new research. Immersive site tours will be led by local archaeological experts and members of descendant Native American communities who will provide alternative views sure to lead to lively discussions. Dr. Jeffery J. Clark has more than 30 years of archaeologi­cal experience, working extensively in Southwest Asia and the North American Southwest. His research interest is as­sessing the scale and impact of human migration, focusing on the late precontact Salado Phenomenon. Dr. William H. Doelle has more than 30 years of experience as a professional archaeologist. He has worked extensively in Mexico, Guatemala, and the North American Southwest. His primary research interest is the demographic history of the Greater Southwest. He is the founder and president of Archaeology Southwest. Lyle J. Balenquah, Hopi, is a member of the Greasewood Clan from the Village of Bacavi on Third Mesa. He has earned Bachelor’s (1999) and Master’s (2002) degrees in Anthropology from Northern Arizona University. For over 15 years he has worked throughout the American South­west as an archaeologist documenting ancestral Hopi set­tlements and lifeways.

Tour begins and ends in Phoenix and includes 6 nights lodging in comfortable hotels, all meals, transportation study leader honorariums and admissions. $200 of the tuition is a tax deductable gift to Archaeology  Southwest and Southwest Seminars. Contact Southwest Seminars for registration information. $2,395 Double Occupancy, $400 for a Private Room.

 

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